Things I’ve Learned About Indie Publishing and Promo So Far

It occurred to me, while I was actually responsibly working on my next novel (and adding to my NaNoWriMo word count), that maybe people were looking for an update on how things were going with my first novel, and possibly looking for some tips to help them. While I have learned a great deal, it’s been less than a week since the release so nothing is a hard-and-fast truth when it comes to anything that’s happened since then. I only really know what has happened so far for me, and what I learned about the technical aspects of publishing through Createspace and Kindle Desktop Published (or KDP as it’s usually referred to).

I was admittedly paranoid and anal about the technical aspects of submitting files to Createspace, because so many people seemed to be confused about it. Then there were all those fear-inducing articles written on a competing company’s site, talking about how terrible it was to publish through them. They are, of course, biased, because they offer the same services, and it was their smear campaign that turned me off using their services. I’m Canadian, and don’t hold much with those sorts of business practices. Doesn’t seem very professional, and that’s my same moral basis for not naming the company that does it. If you ever look into self-publishing you’ll find it, I’m sure.

There were no complications with submitting my files, however, so I don’t have a clue why people had a hard time with it, but I am a former accountant and administrator so I tend to be detail-oriented. Not everyone is geared that way. And believe me, getting lost in details is not always a positive thing, so if you’re not like that you can feel grateful for it. When I ordered proofs (I got five of them…just because), the books were put together fine. No two books will ever be identical, particularly in self-publishing, because this isn’t precision German engineering we’re talking about. It’s a book. Even the best traditional publishers have variations in individual books. Some so bad that they have to be returned. Happily that was not my experience with Createspace.

The Kindle segment was much easier. I chose to start with Createspace, because then it can be put through to Kindle after the main part is done, and I wanted to be absolutely certain that people would see both options on the same page when they saw the listing on Amazon. When it comes to royalties there isn’t much difference in my case. I only get eighty cents more for the paperback than I do for the Kindle, and so far only one paperback was ordered. Granted, I’ve got a bunch of people asking for signed copies, which means plenty of orders to come. I just haven’t tallied them.

The big surprise for me was the lending library. I checked off the box to participate in that with a sort of shrug. I didn’t think it would be a big part of my royalties, but I’m really, really glad I did it now. The last time I checked, authors were getting paid approximately $0.0058 per page. When you’re having thousands of pages read per day, it can really add up. In fact, I will probably make more money from that than I will from purchases, and people who subscribe to the service get to read the book for no extra cost above their monthly fee. More readers means a better chance someone will leave a review, and from what I’m seeing it actually impacts my book’s ranking on Amazon. I almost cracked the top 100 (in a specific genre, not the main list) yesterday and today, which was pretty exciting for me. Once you manage to do that, apparently Amazon starts promoting your book for you, so I’m doing what I can to make that happen.

Being pretty much broke, I haven’t spent a lot of money on promo, though I have found some really great bargains there, including sites that include and promote your book for free because they want to get books out to their readers. One such site is AUTHORSdb, and another is iauthor. I mean, when you’re broke you sometimes have to spend more time on promotion than you would like, if you want to get your book out there, but it’s worth it if you ever want to not be broke. Struggling for art is fine, but who actually wants to if they don’t have to? I’ve got a promo through SweetFreeBooks coming out on November 29th (it’ll be free for a day!!) and they only charge $5 right now. Your book either has to be 99 cents or free, but free promos can really get your ranking up if people know about them. Sure there’s no return on investment on the day the promo runs, but the ROI after-the-fact can be huge according to every other author I’ve spoken to or read.

Other free promo ideas include eReaderIQ, Content Mo, Hot Zippy, BeeZeeBooks, Choosy Bookworm, PeopleReads, ReadFree.ly, and Booktastik. A lot of those are for when you’re promoting a giveaway or contest, but well worth it if you’re trying to boost your numbers with a free Kindle deal.

Another suggestion, which I was reminded of by my business partner and host of the show I produce, is to do radio shows and podcasts. Now, I’m lucky because I’ve already been able to do one of those without even asking, because Steve Kovacs chose to have me come on and talk about my novels, along with the very real possibilities behind it that were the inspiration for writing it. We don’t normally have fiction authors on the show, though we’ve had some, so I didn’t want to change the format just to be able to plug my book. He was nice enough to suggest an hour-long show, but I said it wouldn’t work. Hey, I’m Canadian. I can’t help it.

If you decide you’re up for interviews, a good option is to use Radio Guest List to find potential shows. You can sign up for their free e-mail that’s meant for guests, or you can choose to go directly to their listings where you’ll get a lot more possibilities than what they send out to you. I know most writers are probably introverts, and it may not be easy to do interviews, but the majority of the ones you’ll find that pertain to authors will be podcasts rather than vodcasts – audio-only, as opposed to video. You also don’t have to leave your house. Technology is a wonderful thing. Just watch for any shows that request a donation, though they’re few and far between.

At the very least you should be prepared to offer them an electronic review copy, along with a media kit. Don’t worry. I haven’t put together an actual media kit yet myself. It’s something I’m going to have to do soon, because I’m trying to get proper book reviewers to take a look at it, which means professionalism will be required on my part. Especially as an indie author. I luckily have my own company, and I used it as my publisher, which might make them more likely to take a look at it.

Just as you would with your book, try to make sure you have a well-edited review request. When I was editing my book I used a program called Natural Reader (there’s a free version, though it has some downsides) to read my chapters out loud to me, and you can do the same with any of your official correspondence. (I have the free version, and the third voice on the list of available ones was even better than the paid voices I found, so I’m happy to use the free version of the software for now.) Even when we read our writing out loud to ourselves, we often read out what we think is there, rather than what actually is there. One of many compelling reasons to have your book professionally edited if you can afford to do so.

I had to put my money into promo, so aside from my daughter reading the book, as well as a friend of mine, I used Natural Reader. Windows has something built-in that does the same thing, but I got irritated trying to set it up because the voice kept telling me every button I was hovering over, when that wasn’t what I needed at all. It’s meant for blind people, not authors, so I can’t say I blame them. It’s just not its true function.

In case you’re wondering, I’m not getting paid for any of these links. This is all stuff I found on my own and I’m actually using. None of these sites have any idea I’m linking to them. In fact, I don’t get paid for this blog in any way, shape, or form. It’s just too random. The only thing I have on here are linked images to animal shelters I personally donate to, and hope someone else will choose to as well.

As for paid promo, aside from SweetFreeBooks, I’ve used a few different ones without really thinking it through and being critical – probably because I wasn’t spending much money with each of them. Since then I’ve found a site that offers some advice on that sort of thing, called eNovels Authors at Work. The link I’ve provided is the first in a series of articles on promoters they’ve found that are good and bad. I haven’t even read all of the series yet, since there are at least five parts to it. I’ve already found a lot of good information, so if you go through their blog I’m sure you will, too.

Something weird that I noticed about pricing for a lot of book promotion services is that they charge more when your book is free. Not all of them, but most. For instance, BookBub charges less when the Kindle is free, but sites like FreeBooksy charge more. I used their BargainBooksy list, which was only $35 to promote a $2.99 book, but the other list can cost anywhere from $40 to $200, depending on the genre (since some genres have more people subscribed to them, which means the books go out to more people). I understand the reasons, of course, because there are a lot more subscribers for the free lists, which means way more exposure for an author, but it’s confusing when BookBub does the opposite. Of course, they have everything all on one list. They’re also a lot harder to get on, for good reason. They have a huge list of subscribers.

I’ve done massive amounts of research on all this promotion stuff. Many, many hours of it that I would rather have spent writing. When you’re a novelist, however, there’s little choice. Unless you’re Stephen King or something, even traditional publishers don’t provide much in the way of promotion for their authors, which was my reason for heading straight to the indie route. I get much higher royalties, with no difference in work, except for the formatting and cover stuff – it’s a very good thing my daughter is skilled with Photoshop, because I suck at graphics. Even opening a proper graphics program gives me a splitting headache. Every single time. I can use MS Paint, and I can crop or resize photos, but that’s pretty much it.

I really wish I could afford someone to do all this stuff for me, because I just don’t wanna. Hopefully I’ve managed to save my fellow authors a bit of time with this bunch of information. It really is worth it, though. I got my first review yesterday, and it was amazing. It was five stars, with a great deal of praise in the comment section, and I don’t know the person who left it (unless they used an alias). I also didn’t pay for it, which you can find someone to do if you go on fiverr, but I’m hoping to get real reviews as opposed to paid, ergo biased, ones. It just didn’t seem very honourable, though I was admittedly tempted. Now I’m really glad I held off, because I’ve got two (honest) 5-star reviews on there, and I’m pretty sure I don’t know either of them. There’s criticism within them, but they still liked the story, so that gives me something to work with for the next book. I’m quite thrilled to see that one complaint was that there wasn’t enough detail on something, which means they would rather I had left in some stuff I took out because I thought it would be too boring.

[WARNING! *Shameless Book Plug Ahead!*] If anyone reading this is interested, Tipping Point is available on Amazon here at this link. If you’re from a different country, it will tell you where to go (and it’s polite about it). It’s the first of a pre-through-post-apocalyptic trilogy that’s based on a very real possibility. I was actually warned by a former Ontario Hydro executive that the power outages were going to get much, much worse, and that warning turned into a novel. Hopefully we can figure out a way to avoid it in the near future, but we’ll have to wait and see.

The first book takes you up to the apocalypse. The second will take you through it. The third will show you a possible new beginning for humanity. The man who reviewed Tipping Point said it was terrifying, but there’s action, romance, suspense, adventure, and science fiction. You can read it for free if you’re a subscriber and have access to Amazon’s lending library, or the Kindle’s regular price is $2.99. If you read it and enjoy it (or even if you have a criticism of it), please leave a review – they’re vital for indie authors. I honestly want to know what people think. It will help me improve as a writer.

Since the second book isn’t going to write itself, and I have to catch up on my word count for National Novel Writing Month, I’m going to get back to it. Here’s hoping my writer friends will attain the success that will allow them to do what they love for a living, rather than working to be able to afford to write. It’s what we all dream of, isn’t it?

I’m Either Livin’ the Dream, or Dreaming My Life

Since the middle of September my life has been nothing but a fantasy. Now, I don’t mean a fantasy where it’s been a series of perfect events. Not at all. Though it’s certainly been perfect in its own way. Of course, no one else can really see it happening, because it’s mostly been inside my own head. That’s one of the many joys and frustrations of being a writer. You can be as happy as a clam (decide for yourself if a clam is really happy), yet no one has a clue that you are.

Starting around September 15th I began writing a book. I finished it (technically) around October 12th. Now I’ve spent the last few weeks editing and revising that book. I dream about the characters, and my first thought when I wake up is about those ‘people’ and what they’re ‘doing.’ I don’t remember ever getting involved with my writing like this before, even when I was much younger and was getting those mad spurts of creativity that made me look like a female version of Dr. Emmett Brown. Oddly, my biological father looks a bit like Christopher Lloyd, but thankfully I don’t look like my father – not that I’m really happy about looking like my mother either.
I actually wake up, roll over, and start working every single day. It’s become my waking habit if you will. I live within my book, because it’s the only life I have at the moment. Not that I consider that a bad thing, because I truly love fiction and its ability to zip us around through alternative realities. The places we can go, the people we’ll meet, and the things we’ll do in those books can never be duplicated in everyday life.
This year I decided I would join National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo as it’s called. After writing 126,000+ words in less than a month, I realized that writing 50,000 words was rather like a walk in the park for me. (In case you’re unfamiliar with NaNoWriMo, the goal is to write 50,000 words in a 30-day period.) I’m three days into it, while still putting the final touches on the other book, so I’m just hitting the daily word count for that book, but since I’m also working on the other one still I’m not too worried about it.
The joy of writing this new book for the contest, is that it’s the second book in a trilogy. Both books are connected, and everything is staying super-fresh in my mind. This is a very good thing, because I have a lot of characters to keep track of, and various events on the timelines, so I don’t want to lose the details. The world has basically come to an end, a lot of people have died, and the survivors are limping along. I honestly never thought I’d write science fiction, as apocalyptic fiction is labelled, but my personal interest in off-grid living became a trigger.
The research, before, during, and after writing the book, has actually been a joy. It’s all stuff I’m interested in for my own life, and I feel I need to know anyway, so the two-bird-with-one-stone thing makes it seem like half the work to begin with. Plus I have a genuine interest and get enjoyment from learning about pretty much anything. My head has been stuck in a book (if you can call online research a book) even when it wasn’t stuck in my book.
You might be wondering why I would have to research after writing the book, but that’s to do with revision and editing. I occasionally get to a part where my critical thinking skills finally kick in and ask, “Yes, but is that really how things work, or were you just pretending to be a know-it-all?” I’ve been schooled a few times since the ‘completion’ in mid-October. In fact, a friend of mine has introduced me to some knowledge on survival knives recently, that may find its way into the book even now when I’m about to format it for CreateSpace. I’m not sure if it’s particularly relevant, but I’m keeping an open mind.
At this very moment I’m actually supposed to be rewriting the first two pages of the book, along with the epilogue. Both are rather ham-fisted at the moment, and not what I intended, but sometimes writing is like that. You just get the general concept down, and fiddle with it later. Not everyone wants to write like that. Often people who call themselves writers will refuse to write unless the blinding light of inspiration strikes. Most often those writers never finish a project. Believe me, I know. I was one of those.
I’ll be fair to myself here and say that a good portion of the reason I wasn’t doing my ‘real’ writing (also known as novel-length fiction), was pain. It can be very difficult to get out of your own world and into a fictitious one, when your body is screaming at you. I had to figure out a way to write so that I was as physically comfortable as possible, which isn’t easy if you’re trying to avoid mind-numbing narcotics. I don’t want to be one of those writers that can only write if they’re drunk or high. It’s one point on which I’m in complete agreement with Stephen King. Substance abuse is substance abuse, whether or not you’re using it to write. I feel the same about music, actually. I’ve never like listening to drug-infused garbage. I figure if they can’t play it straight, then they really can’t play it. Anything else is like being an athlete on steroids or blood-doping (ahem, Lance Armstrong).
Thankfully I’ve given myself a major deadline on my first book. I’ve told a whole bunch of people that it’s coming out on Friday the 13th (yes, this very next one, here in November). It’s most likely that will be Kindle only, because the paperback may take a couple of weeks longer to be finalized. Still, a promise is a promise, and that means there will be no more fiddling and procrastinating after I submit the formatted work.
I love Friday the 13th. It’s my lucky day, and it has been my whole life. Back when I was a figure skater (the main cause of the pain I deal with these days), I always did exceptionally well during tests and competitions if they happened to fall on that day. Good things were attracted to me on Friday the 13th. A friend of mine (who actually knows and loves me) tells me it’s because I’m the devil, and so I chuckle wickedly in response. Maybe I am, maybe I’m not. It could all be an intricate plot. In my life pretty much everything is.

It’s Never Been a Better Time to Be a Writer – Kindle Part Two

It has taken me a while to get back to writing the second part of this, because I’ve already been taking my own advice. It really is a great time to be a writer, and I wanted to capitalize on the changes I’ll be telling you about here in this post. In fact, I wrote a whole book between September 15th and October 15th. Actually, I finished around the 12th of October if I remember correctly, and since then I’ve been editing and revising as madly as I wrote it. Yes. That was me. I did that! 120,000 words worth at the time, though it’s since crept up to 125,000 with the addition of some new scenes I felt were necessary. (I’ll be announcing a release date soon, and sharing the cover design around that time.)

In this day and age anyone can be a published author. I really do mean anyone. Even me. You don’t have to go through stacks of envelopes, a zillion e-mails, or receive a hundred rejection letters. No, you can let your readers decide whether or not they like your books, not some executive sitting in the ivory tower of traditional publishing. Let’s face it. Readers know what they want far better than some stranger.

Traditional publishers try to convince authors that they can’t go it alone. Well, here’s where my true-false meter flashes a big, red light. They’re lying to you on three counts. One, it’s entirely possible to go it alone. Two, you really don’t have to be alone out there. Three, the majority of writers who go through a traditional publisher often end up going it alone anyway. There is very little support for a writer when it comes to promotion. You have to hire your own people for that.

The best you can expect from your traditional publisher is to be included in the information they send out to book stores. You don’t usually get any bookmarks to hand out, they don’t book radio and television appearances, and they don’t take out ads promoting your book. You have to do all that yourself. And for all that nothingness that you get from them, what’s the bottom line? About ten or fifteen cents per book sold.

In other words, to receive about $40,000 per year you would have to sell up to 400,000 copies of your book. That year and every year thereafter. Pretty tough to make a living as a writer under those circumstances. Sure, the idea is that you’re going to write more books, and then the effect would be cumulative, but why would you want to give all that money to a traditional publisher anyway? What have they done for you lately?

So, here’s the deal. Self-publishing used to be a great way for printing companies to gouge desperate authors. The industry has cleaned up a great deal, however, and now it’s at the point where publishing a book can be completely free, or so ridiculously cheap that it might as well be. It all depends on what you need the self-publishing company to do. If you publish through Kindle, the formatting costs absolutely nothing. Same with CreateSpace, which is the print-on-demand side of Amazon, as opposed to the e-book only side. CreateSpace will try to up-sell you on stuff, but if you have any competence with a computer this should be a non-issue. Or you can go to websites like Fiverr and pay someone $5 to do the work for you.

The same holds true for cover design. If you’re no good at graphics, and you don’t know anyone who is (and who would be willing to do it for free), there are a lot of cover designers on Fiverr, as well as a number of very reasonably-priced graphic artists out there who specialize in cover design. Believe me, you want someone good. I did a mock-up of the cover I want done, but it totally sucks as it is. That’s why I’m having my daughter deal with the heavy-lifting there. Your cover is what will sell your book, far more so than the blurb that accompanies it. As a reader, I know very well that I tend to skim the back-cover paragraph. If I see certain keywords I’m happy, but the cover has to get me to pick up the book in the first place. If my daughter can’t come up with something really grabby, then I’m going to talk to some of the wonderful folks on Fiverr.

My book’s cover art is a bit of a challenge, however. It’s hard to define it in an image. They say a picture is worth a thousand words, but can you encapsulate 125,000 words in a single image? Well, I guess we’ll see what we can come up with there.

As for the rest of it, the resources that are out there if you do a simple Google search are amazing. Truly amazing. So many blogs and articles about how to take on different aspects of writing and self-publishing. Everything from the nuts and bolts of forcing yourself to sit down and write, to the hundreds of ways you can market the finished product (including how to time your promotions for the best results). There are some really great ways to promote your books that are completely free. Things like joining pages and groups on Facebook that include people with an interest in the topics your book centres around. For example, my book deals with preparedness and survival, along with an oncoming end-of-the-world scenario. So, any page that talks about those things has the potential to help me market my book (I should say ‘books,’ since this is the beginning of a trilogy).

A great way to market your book is through those e-mail lists I mentioned in my last post for Kindle readers. BookBub and Sweet Free Books are two of them. There’s also FreeBooksy, which I just discovered recently. You can hire people from Fiverr to promote your books for $5, through banner ads, radio shows, or podcasts. I mean, seriously, what’s $5 when it comes to advertising and promotions. BookBub, Sweet Free Books and FreeBooksy cost way more than $5, usually, unless they’re running a special. Currently Sweet Free Books is actually $5, but that could change at any time, so always look at their pricing. Last time I looked, I think it was 99-cents. Some e-mail sites require your books to have a certain number of reviews on Amazon, or a rating of a certain amount. BookBub can go out to as many as a million (or more) people, however, and their rates of return are really quite good. Well worth the hundreds of dollars they charge (and the amount depends on the genre and listing type – whether you’re offering your book free or for discounted rates).

Amazon has a built-in tool for marketing that I’d suggest you use if you publish through Kindle. It’s Kindle Select (check out this article for tips to leverage it). It means agreeing to a 90-day exclusivity contract, so you cannot publish through any other e-publisher, no matter what format it is, and you can’t give your e-books away to anyone unless it’s through the 5 free days they give you as an optional promotional tool. This does not apply to any print versions of your books. The reason I suggest you use it is two-fold. First, because your book automatically gets marketed through Amazon – are you really going to get any better advertising than that? Second, your book goes into their Kindle lending library, from which you make a percentage of the royalties. People can read your book for free by subscribing to the service, but you still get paid. If you’re looking for exposure, this is one great way to get it.

Seriously, when it comes to marketing, the options are myriad to the point of being limitless. I’m the kind of person who despises selling. Marketing is just not something I want to spend any time on at all. I’m going to have to, of course, but I’ll be very picky about what I’m doing. Mostly that means paying someone else to do it, but I’m also a cheapskate, so that means I’ll be paying as little as possible at the very beginning. I’ll funnel book profits back into marketing on a sliding scale. If I can afford it, I’ll do it, because the only way to sell your books is to let people know you’ve written them. Bestseller Labs has some really great advice on its site that you should check out, too.

So, what’s the bottom line on profit? Okay, most writers write because they have a compulsion to do so. They really do it for love, if they’re any kind of writer. (I’ve been doing it since I was twelve. Not that I was any good at that age, but I was still writing. I’m 44 now, so I’ve had writing in my head for 32 years. I wasn’t writing the whole time in a physical sense, but my head was always telling stories to me.) However, people still need to eat, so we all have to make money at doing things if we don’t want to starve. Kindle offers you up to 70% royalties, and CreateSpace offers up to 60%. I’m focusing on those for two reasons. One, their royalties really are the highest I’ve found. Two, this article has Kindle in the title. I will be using them both, because I want print version of my books. Call me old-fashioned if you like, but it’s also a vanity thing. I want them in my house. I want to be able to give them out. When I read I tend to read e-books these days, but it’s pretty damn hard to sign and hand out e-books.

What do those royalties come down to? Well, let’s do the math. If you have a trade paperback selling for ten bucks (which is extremely cheap these days) through a traditional publisher, and you only get ten or fifteen cents per copy sold, you have to sell up to $4 million in books every year to your readers to get $40,000 per year. If you’re getting seventy cents on the dollar, however, in order to get that much in annual income you only have to sell a little over $57,142 worth of books per year. You can easily charge $2.99 a book and still make out like a bandit, only having to sell about 19,048 copies each year. In other words, your readers have to shell out seventy times more money, just so you can earn a semi-decent income, if you choose to publish the old way.

If you’re writing a series, the options are amazing when it comes to promotion and sales. You absolutely must take advantage of this stuff if you’re writing a trilogy, or a giant series. For one thing, every single book in that series will work to promote all the other books. Your sales will increase exponentially, if people like what they’re reading.

This blog is a good example of that, if you think about it. When I first started writing it my readers were pretty thin on the ground. As time went on, even though I don’t have a serious theme going here, I got a lot more readers. That’s because they’ve clicked on something they found on Google, and ended up getting sucked into the black hole of my brain. I’ve been writing a lot fewer posts, and getting a lot more activity on each post, yet without much in the way of promoting them. Half of what I write on here is just to chat with the people who have become loyal readers. Okay, maybe more than half – I’m not really sure, since I just write what I feel like writing. When I do have a post that has some seriousness to it, I’ll usually promote it a little bit through HootSuite, which shoots it out to all my social media platforms.

At the end of a Kindle book (at least it works this way for the Android app), Amazon automatically asks for a rating of the book. If the book is part of a series, Amazon knows this (assuming the author entered that information correctly when they published their books), and it will direct the reader to other books in the series, as well as other books written by the same author. I’ve bought a lot of my books this way. I start out with a free book, but then the rest of the series I willingly pay for if I’m hooked. It’s perfect for readers and authors. Readers find new authors they love, and writers can promote a series of books.

Offering books for free can be a very good idea for other reasons, too. You see, Amazon has a ranking system for all books, and your rank is based on how well your book is doing within its genre. Picking your category is extremely important (see this article for an explanation on categories and what they can mean for authors), because the fewer books there are in a genre, to more likely you are to rank high. The higher you rank, the more likely Amazon will help to promote you. Your book may end up going out to millions of potential buyers, without you having to do the heavy-lifting. I know, if your book is always free then it’s not possible to make money from it. However, the idea is to space out your free promo days (Kindle Select will give you five of them that you can schedule based on your own needs, if that’s the promo type you choose), so that you spike your readership enough to increase your ranking. And if you’ve already got another book published that’s part of the same series, then you’re getting massive promo for it.

Honestly, I cannot begin to cover everything I’ve learned about self-publishing in a single blog post. People dedicate entire blogs to just the marketing end of it. All I can do is tell you that I’m convinced it’s the best option for me when it comes to publishing my own novels. A traditional publisher would have a long way to go to convince me that it was worth signing a contract with them. What they do offer is massive editing and proofreading, plus professional cover design. All of those are available through freelancers, however, and just for the record, the top five things of importance when it comes selling a book are these: Good writing, a good story, a top-notch cover, pristine editing, and marketing. If you want your book to succeed it really should have all five of those elements. Not every successful book does, but if you want to guarantee you sell oodles of books, you should do everything you can to have every one of them in place. And you don’t need a traditional publisher to do that.

It’s Never Been a Better Time to Be a Reader – Kindle Part One

First let me start out by saying that I’m an absolutely voracious reader. I consume books at a very rapid rate, and I’m addicted to them. If I don’t have at least one more book lined up for when I finish the one I’m currently reading, I feel very anxious. I need my fix. So, believe me when I tell you that if there are more free books out there than even I can keep up with (and they’re in my favourite genres), I’m not blowing smoke. In fact, my phone is now completely overloaded with books waiting to be read. The vast majority of those books were completely free, and I downloaded them legally from Amazon.

So let me tell you how it works. No, it’s not a gimmick of any kind where you have to jump through any hoops other than technological ones in the form of downloading the Kindle app and the books themselves. There are two websites out there that I will recommend that sends you daily e-mails about free or nearly-free books. They don’t send you anything else. No spam at all. One is called Sweet Free Books, and the other is BookBub. The other thing you’ll need is an Amazon account. Just do their free sign-up thing if you don’t already have an account.

Both mailing lists ask you for your genre preferences, and that’s what they send you for recommendations, which include the Amazon link for getting the books you choose at that price. Now sometimes these deals go fast, but usually I can try the next day and they’re still there – some last much longer.

This works whether you have a physical Kindle or not. If you have a smartphone or a computer, you can read Kindle books. They have a downloadable app for iOS, Android and BlackBerry. They even have it for Windows phones. They also have the app for your Windows PC, and possibly others. Just go to this link for the various apps. They can send it direct to your phone or e-mail you a link.

Personally, I didn’t like reading on my laptop. Reading on my phone, however, is a totally different story. You can change the font size, type and colour, it’s convenient, and you can carry dozens of books around with it – potentially thousands, depending on your phone’s memory capacity. You can also move the Kindle app to your replaceable memory card, so you have a lot of storage capability for books. It is so much more convenient (and lighter) than carting your current books around, and then your next one just in case you finish the one you’re already reading.

The other thing people need to know about, is that you can look at books by genre and sort by price on Amazon, and you’re going to find hundreds of free books available to you at any given moment. This is where I’ve managed to increase my collection so quickly. One or two books a day is great, and probably more than I’m going to be able to read, but I’m a total hoarder when it comes to reading material.

One more area to scavenge for free reading material are places that store out-of-copyright, or public domain books. After a certain number of years books lose their copyright status. It’s usually somewhere between fifty and a hundred years after the death of the author, depending on which country you live in (and I believe it’s the reader’s country of origin, not the author’s, but I could be wrong). So, if you’ve been looking to catch up on the classics, those are great places to start. Project Gutenberg has a huge collection. Google Books is doing some sort of online indexing now, too, but I haven’t ventured into that except when researching specific topics and I haven’t downloaded anything. Keep in mind that the major databases have books in multiple formats, so if you have a Kindle app you’re looking for the mobi format. Sony has a reader, as does Nook, and Kobo, etc., so make sure you pick the right file format.

However, if you’re looking for a book on one of those sites and it’s not available in mobi, you can download what they do have and convert it very easily using Online-Convert.com. I use this site for so many different things, and I have for years. The conversion works perfectly as far as I can tell. The link I’ve provided is for converting everything from Word documents to PDFs to LIT into mobi files. They also have audio and video converters on there, so it’s a really helpful website for pretty much anyone. I used to use the Microsoft reader, so I’ve got tons of books I’ve had to convert from LIT to mobi.

Let me reassure you once again that everything I’ve told you here is legal. These are books that are either out of copyright, or the authors have chosen to give the Kindle versions of their books away. Now this is the only part of the whole thing that you might be able to call a ploy. The reason authors give away their books is because they’re hoping you’ll love their work and want to buy the rest of them. Now for those of us who love books, paying for a book isn’t a hardship if we can afford it. We want to support the authors, because we want them to keep writing, and a good book is well worth its price. This works especially well when an author has written a series, and at the end of the first book, which they’ve given away free, there’s a link not only to rate the book, but also to purchase the next book(s) in the series.

I’m perfectly okay with that. In fact, it makes things really convenient for me if I love what I’m reading. In most cases the subsequent books are also very reasonably priced. Indie authors are doing this all the time, and they can afford to when they publish with Kindle. Amazon gives authors great royalty percentages on their books, unlike traditional publishers where authors will often make only a dime or so per book sold. Kindle authors can sell a book for under a dollar, and still make five times as much on it as they would have with a traditional publisher. They’re cutting out the biggest middle man. Amazon would be there anyway at the end of the retail chain, but suddenly the reader is no longer paying the bloated salaries of publishers that don’t really do much to help their authors anyway.

“Yeah, but are the books any good?” I can hear that question a thousand miles away. There is an absolute plethora of amazing authors out there, publishing independently. I have friends who have written great books, like the Time Change series written by +Alex Myers. They’re great books, fast-paced, fascinating, and with a ton of research put into them. No, I’m not saying those are free. I got copies of them so I could review the first one, and he was kind enough to send me a couple more of his books because I was so thrilled with the first one I read. I’ll be re-reading the first two Time Change books shortly, because I plan to buy the third one.

That’s the magic of being a reader (or a writer, which I’ll get into in the second part of this blog when I write it), in this ‘day and age’ as they say. There’s a connection between reader and author unlike anything that’s come before. Indie authors are approachable usually. Often they’re looking for feedback on their work. I read a book recently that was a really great story, but badly needed editing, so I e-mailed the author. I explained that I’d given him four stars on Amazon, and my reasons for not giving him five. Seriously, though, if you do that please be kind. Authors can be very sensitive. A story or book can be like one of our offspring, and we want everyone else to love it, too. Make any criticism constructive. I try to be very careful about what I say, and how I say it, because if I like someone’s work enough to want to go to the effort of critiquing it like that, I really want them to continue writing.

Thankfully the author I wrote to seemed to agree with what I’d said, and told me that I had given him new encouragement to finish the sequel. As I said, magic. He knows that there’s a fan out there who likes his brainchild enough to help it grow up a little bit. And he’ll be letting me know as soon as it’s available so I can read it right away.

Of course, it’s not just unknown or indie authors that are giving deals. I get quite a few that are New York Times Bestselling authors. Alice Hoffman, who wrote Practical Magic (yes, the one that became the movie with Sandra Bullock and Nicole Kidman), recently released a book that ended up on my e-mail list of deals. It’s a great marketing tool. A few people get the book and start raving about it, and soon others are buying it at full price, or at least buying other books by the same author.

I’ve been reading a lot of dystopian, apocalyptic fiction lately. A fair bit of zombie stuff, along with a few aliens, and a disease or two wiping out most of the population. It’s a pretty specific interest area, but as I said there’s an absolute plethora of free books on Amazon. Barnes & Noble does the same thing, but at a smaller volume, so I haven’t bothered with a membership with them. I don’t need it.

One series I read recently (that started with a free book), was just wonderful. I don’t know the author personally, though I might e-mail her just to beg her to write another book. Her name is Sarah Lyons Fleming, and the first book in the series is, “Until the End of the World.” There are three novels in the series, and one novella. At first glance the title made me think it was going to be a romance. Sure, there are relationships in it, but the main theme in the books revolves around a zombie apocalypse caused by a virus developed by the army. The main character’s parents were what are called ‘preppers’ who were of the homesteading type. They had backpacks ready to go at all times, a cabin with solar capabilities, canned food to last for years, you name it. Since I’m already personally interested in the topic, the stories were great from that perspective alone. On top of that, I fell in love with the characters. Important people die, and you actually care that they’re gone.

As you can imagine, I posted a great review for all of the books, other than the novella which I just haven’t gotten around to posting yet, except for giving it the five stars through my phone app.

The abundance of book is like a utopia for me, as I (ironically perhaps) read about dystopias. Those e-mails from BookBub and Sweet Free Books are ones that I eagerly anticipate each day, wondering what new literary treasure awaits me. Don’t get me wrong. I have hundreds of actual books on my shelves. I prefer hardcover when it comes to reference material I keep for my research, or even oversize softcover. I need to be able to glance over at the page continuously sometimes, and my phone shutting off automatically would get annoying for that. However, it’s just easier to relax with my phone for recreational reading, and outright reading of non-fiction.

If you’re a reader (and I assume you are if you’re even bothering to read this particular post), you’ll be ecstatic if you delve into these waters. They’re filled with wonderful stories, and every story that you read makes you a better person. Fiction teaches understanding and empathy in people, so if your kids have smartphones encourage them to read on them instead of spending hours on social media. There’s nothing more important to the development of human beings than reading, and the freedom to read as we like. From the time I got so angry reading Fahrenheit 451 that I threw the book across the room when they started burning books in the story, I’ve fervently believed that reading was vital. I was a young kid doing a book report – fifth grade I believe, because I remember who my teacher was – yet, books were so important to me even then.

I never finished reading Bradbury’s book, though I will someday, but my teacher didn’t punish me or give me a bad grade. In fact, I wrote the report based on what I’d read so far, if I remember correctly, and then explained what happened to my teacher. She was actually rather impressed by my ferocious love of books, and I got a really good mark.

Escapism is necessary to a healthy psyche. It helps us cope when things are difficult, allowing us a release valve. Some forms of escapism are harmful, though, whereas reading is not. The more we read, the more we open our minds and hearts. The more people in this world who do that, the more likely humanity is to move forward, rather than petering out.

Now, turn on that device and get downloading! Happy reading everyone!!